March 3, 2020

Bandaids don't heal all wounds

"Because many developers see search engines as the solution to the problems users have when trying to find information in their products, search engines become Band-Aids for poorly designed navigation systems and other architectural weaknesses. If you see yourself falling into this trap, you should probably suspend implementing your search system until you fix your navigation system’s problems. You’ll find that search systems often perform better if they can take advantage of aspects of strong navigation systems, such as the controlled vocabulary terms used to tag content. And users will often benefit even more from using both types of finding if they work together well. Of course, your product’s navigation might be a disaster for political reasons, such as an inability among your organization’s decision makers to agree on a system-wide navigation system. In such cases, reality trumps what ought to be, and search might indeed be your best alternative."‍

<p-lg>I found this to be a good reminder that Band-Aids won't heal all wounds. Larger problems like poor navigation require that you spend more time fixing them, instead of just slapping a search box on your website to "help".‍<p-lg>

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Bandaids don't heal all wounds

information architecture
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March 3, 2020

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

"Because many developers see search engines as the solution to the problems users have when trying to find information in their products, search engines become Band-Aids for poorly designed navigation systems and other architectural weaknesses. If you see yourself falling into this trap, you should probably suspend implementing your search system until you fix your navigation system’s problems. You’ll find that search systems often perform better if they can take advantage of aspects of strong navigation systems, such as the controlled vocabulary terms used to tag content. And users will often benefit even more from using both types of finding if they work together well. Of course, your product’s navigation might be a disaster for political reasons, such as an inability among your organization’s decision makers to agree on a system-wide navigation system. In such cases, reality trumps what ought to be, and search might indeed be your best alternative."‍

<p-lg>I found this to be a good reminder that Band-Aids won't heal all wounds. Larger problems like poor navigation require that you spend more time fixing them, instead of just slapping a search box on your website to "help".‍<p-lg>

March 3, 2020

Bandaids don't heal all wounds

information architecture
"Because many developers see search engines as the solution to the problems users have when trying to find information in their products, search engines become Band-Aids for poorly designed navigation systems and other architectural weaknesses. If you see yourself falling into this trap, you should probably suspend implementing your search system until you fix your navigation system’s problems. You’ll find that search systems often perform better if they can take advantage of aspects of strong navigation systems, such as the controlled vocabulary terms used to tag content. And users will often benefit even more from using both types of finding if they work together well. Of course, your product’s navigation might be a disaster for political reasons, such as an inability among your organization’s decision makers to agree on a system-wide navigation system. In such cases, reality trumps what ought to be, and search might indeed be your best alternative."‍

<p-lg>I found this to be a good reminder that Band-Aids won't heal all wounds. Larger problems like poor navigation require that you spend more time fixing them, instead of just slapping a search box on your website to "help".‍<p-lg>