March 3, 2020

Products create the barrier, not the person

"In other words, disability is a conflict between someone’s functional capability and the world we have constructed. In this social view of disability, it is the product that creates the barrier, not the person, just as design is at fault when a site has poor usability."‍

<p-lg>This struck me because as a society I feel we look at people with disabilities as if they are "missing" something. Sure, maybe they're missing an arm, sight, or certain cognitive abilities, but they aren't any less of a person. And maybe it's our products that are only making their disability more obvious.<p-lg>

<p-lg>What more magical experience could there be for an experience designer than to effectively "take away" someone's disability?<p-lg>

<p-lg>After the release of online grocery pickup at Walmart, we received (and continue) to receive emails and feedback about how this is happening. The funny thing is that I don't thing we were "aiming" at helping people in wheelchairs who struggle to get in the store to do their grocery shopping. We were mostly aiming at busy families (who may also struggle to get to the store and bring their kids along), but online grocery pickup and delivery has made everyone's lives better. I think that's pretty cool.‍<p-lg>

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Products create the barrier, not the person

ux design
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March 3, 2020

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

"In other words, disability is a conflict between someone’s functional capability and the world we have constructed. In this social view of disability, it is the product that creates the barrier, not the person, just as design is at fault when a site has poor usability."‍

<p-lg>This struck me because as a society I feel we look at people with disabilities as if they are "missing" something. Sure, maybe they're missing an arm, sight, or certain cognitive abilities, but they aren't any less of a person. And maybe it's our products that are only making their disability more obvious.<p-lg>

<p-lg>What more magical experience could there be for an experience designer than to effectively "take away" someone's disability?<p-lg>

<p-lg>After the release of online grocery pickup at Walmart, we received (and continue) to receive emails and feedback about how this is happening. The funny thing is that I don't thing we were "aiming" at helping people in wheelchairs who struggle to get in the store to do their grocery shopping. We were mostly aiming at busy families (who may also struggle to get to the store and bring their kids along), but online grocery pickup and delivery has made everyone's lives better. I think that's pretty cool.‍<p-lg>

March 3, 2020

Products create the barrier, not the person

ux design
"In other words, disability is a conflict between someone’s functional capability and the world we have constructed. In this social view of disability, it is the product that creates the barrier, not the person, just as design is at fault when a site has poor usability."‍

<p-lg>This struck me because as a society I feel we look at people with disabilities as if they are "missing" something. Sure, maybe they're missing an arm, sight, or certain cognitive abilities, but they aren't any less of a person. And maybe it's our products that are only making their disability more obvious.<p-lg>

<p-lg>What more magical experience could there be for an experience designer than to effectively "take away" someone's disability?<p-lg>

<p-lg>After the release of online grocery pickup at Walmart, we received (and continue) to receive emails and feedback about how this is happening. The funny thing is that I don't thing we were "aiming" at helping people in wheelchairs who struggle to get in the store to do their grocery shopping. We were mostly aiming at busy families (who may also struggle to get to the store and bring their kids along), but online grocery pickup and delivery has made everyone's lives better. I think that's pretty cool.‍<p-lg>