December 19, 2019

Research Study Week in Baltimore!

<p-lg>This week was finally the action-packed part of the semester! Up until now we’ve been learning and preparing our research design. Now it was time to put it into action! This was also my first time on University of Baltimore campus, so that was fun too. <p-lg>

Our Study

<p-lg>We performed a convergent mixed methods study based on a previous study that a previous group performed. In their quantitative study, they studied whether graphical passwords were more memorable for children than alpha-numeric passwords. They gave had each child create 5 passwords, some graphical and some alpha-numeric, all in different orders to prevent order bias. The touch targets for their graphical passwords were 40px. <p-lg>

<p-lg>After creating the passwords, the children were distracted for 20 minutes in a different room, given craft supplies (paper, crayons, etc.) and asked to “help create the password system of the future”.<p-lg>

<p-lg>From their study they concluded that alpha-numeric passwords were still more successful, but noted that had the touch targets been 20px larger, they would have been more successful. <p-lg>

<p-lg>We decided to test their conclusion. We performed almost the same study, increasing the touch area to 60px, and changing a few of the questions that we thought could be better. <p-lg>

Observations

<p-lg>On our first day we had 2 participants, ages 7 and 9. I got to help out in the distraction room and it was A BLAST. I learned a bunch from these 2 boys about how they think about passwords and they gave us some great insights. While just 2 participants is hardly conclusive evidence, even for qualitative data, it did reinforce some things that I’ve been learning about designing for kids.<p-lg>

1 They’re Not Afraid to Do Things that are out of the ordinary

<p-lg>Kid’s quickly break through the awkward and into creation mode. We adults are far more scared of what others will think of our ideas, no matter if we’ve established a “no dumb ideas” zone. Whether they understand exactly what they’re supposed to do or not, children quickly start making things.<p-lg>

<p-lg>And they just start at a natural space for them, then things kind of normalize as a group. As adults, we too often try to start at what we think is natural for the group, then talk about our interests as we feel comfortable. This often backfires because the group hasn’t normalized and can’t until we break out and start moving the conversation as a group. This usually requires someone picking a topic and then the group moving it around. This makes kids natural brainstormers.<p-lg>

<p-lg>When we were in the distraction session with Jim, he launched us into a discussion about his favorite video game, Skylanders. He told us all about the train that you ride through the game, the rare trophies you find, and was obsessed with finding the last boss and all the treasure chests. <p-lg>

<p-lg>Jim didn’t start off into a discussion about “passwords of the future”, he just started into something that felt natural to him that “passwords of the future” kind of reminded him of, and went from there. The group then had something to twist, bend, and mold as we brainstormed.<p-lg>

2 They may not know that they’re helping

<p-lg>Both Steven and Jim both expressed a sentiment that they didn’t really know what they were doing to help, but were just drawing random things. But this ended up being perfect! As they told us about what their drawing was and created different elements of the drawing they helped us peer into their brain and see what was important to them. <p-lg>

<p-lg>We asked them to help us design the password system of the future. Steven started drawing random lines, which turned into a rocket ship that flew into a pie. Somehow he moved on to fortune cookies that hold hints, and there’s a special cookie called the “Party fortune cookie”. <p-lg>

<p-lg>You take 5 fortune cookies and hide them in a gross-looking pie (but it’s actually a very tasty pie, you just tell everyone that it’s not). <p-lg>

<p-lg>Steven didn’t think this was a very valuable exercise, he was just passing the time. But we could see some themes that seemed important to him: <p-lg>

  • <p-lg>Multiple items could make up a password (fortune cookies)<p-lg>
  • <p-lg>Make it look unappealing or uninteresting to someone else (the gross pie)<p-lg>
  • <p-lg>One special item for differentiation (Party cookie vs. other cookies) <p-lg>

3 We can’t design for them without them

<p-lg>Obvious, but Steven’s “Party Fortune Cookies inside gross-looking pies” idea and Jim’s obsession on completing everything in a game reminded me how important it is that “You Are Not the User”. <p-lg>

<p-lg>What we’re learning is that children’s ideas about what it means to be secure online are quite different than adults and they think about the world from a completely different lens. Letting them co-create with us is incredibly important to creating meaning experiences for them.<p-lg>

Conclusion

<p-lg>It was a super fun week, and I learned a lot. I was also honored to be featured on UBALT’s social media outlets.<p-lg>

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Research Study Week in Baltimore!

ux design
|
December 19, 2019

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

<p-lg>This week was finally the action-packed part of the semester! Up until now we’ve been learning and preparing our research design. Now it was time to put it into action! This was also my first time on University of Baltimore campus, so that was fun too. <p-lg>

Our Study

<p-lg>We performed a convergent mixed methods study based on a previous study that a previous group performed. In their quantitative study, they studied whether graphical passwords were more memorable for children than alpha-numeric passwords. They gave had each child create 5 passwords, some graphical and some alpha-numeric, all in different orders to prevent order bias. The touch targets for their graphical passwords were 40px. <p-lg>

<p-lg>After creating the passwords, the children were distracted for 20 minutes in a different room, given craft supplies (paper, crayons, etc.) and asked to “help create the password system of the future”.<p-lg>

<p-lg>From their study they concluded that alpha-numeric passwords were still more successful, but noted that had the touch targets been 20px larger, they would have been more successful. <p-lg>

<p-lg>We decided to test their conclusion. We performed almost the same study, increasing the touch area to 60px, and changing a few of the questions that we thought could be better. <p-lg>

Observations

<p-lg>On our first day we had 2 participants, ages 7 and 9. I got to help out in the distraction room and it was A BLAST. I learned a bunch from these 2 boys about how they think about passwords and they gave us some great insights. While just 2 participants is hardly conclusive evidence, even for qualitative data, it did reinforce some things that I’ve been learning about designing for kids.<p-lg>

1 They’re Not Afraid to Do Things that are out of the ordinary

<p-lg>Kid’s quickly break through the awkward and into creation mode. We adults are far more scared of what others will think of our ideas, no matter if we’ve established a “no dumb ideas” zone. Whether they understand exactly what they’re supposed to do or not, children quickly start making things.<p-lg>

<p-lg>And they just start at a natural space for them, then things kind of normalize as a group. As adults, we too often try to start at what we think is natural for the group, then talk about our interests as we feel comfortable. This often backfires because the group hasn’t normalized and can’t until we break out and start moving the conversation as a group. This usually requires someone picking a topic and then the group moving it around. This makes kids natural brainstormers.<p-lg>

<p-lg>When we were in the distraction session with Jim, he launched us into a discussion about his favorite video game, Skylanders. He told us all about the train that you ride through the game, the rare trophies you find, and was obsessed with finding the last boss and all the treasure chests. <p-lg>

<p-lg>Jim didn’t start off into a discussion about “passwords of the future”, he just started into something that felt natural to him that “passwords of the future” kind of reminded him of, and went from there. The group then had something to twist, bend, and mold as we brainstormed.<p-lg>

2 They may not know that they’re helping

<p-lg>Both Steven and Jim both expressed a sentiment that they didn’t really know what they were doing to help, but were just drawing random things. But this ended up being perfect! As they told us about what their drawing was and created different elements of the drawing they helped us peer into their brain and see what was important to them. <p-lg>

<p-lg>We asked them to help us design the password system of the future. Steven started drawing random lines, which turned into a rocket ship that flew into a pie. Somehow he moved on to fortune cookies that hold hints, and there’s a special cookie called the “Party fortune cookie”. <p-lg>

<p-lg>You take 5 fortune cookies and hide them in a gross-looking pie (but it’s actually a very tasty pie, you just tell everyone that it’s not). <p-lg>

<p-lg>Steven didn’t think this was a very valuable exercise, he was just passing the time. But we could see some themes that seemed important to him: <p-lg>

  • <p-lg>Multiple items could make up a password (fortune cookies)<p-lg>
  • <p-lg>Make it look unappealing or uninteresting to someone else (the gross pie)<p-lg>
  • <p-lg>One special item for differentiation (Party cookie vs. other cookies) <p-lg>

3 We can’t design for them without them

<p-lg>Obvious, but Steven’s “Party Fortune Cookies inside gross-looking pies” idea and Jim’s obsession on completing everything in a game reminded me how important it is that “You Are Not the User”. <p-lg>

<p-lg>What we’re learning is that children’s ideas about what it means to be secure online are quite different than adults and they think about the world from a completely different lens. Letting them co-create with us is incredibly important to creating meaning experiences for them.<p-lg>

Conclusion

<p-lg>It was a super fun week, and I learned a lot. I was also honored to be featured on UBALT’s social media outlets.<p-lg>

December 19, 2019

Research Study Week in Baltimore!

ux design
ux research

<p-lg>This week was finally the action-packed part of the semester! Up until now we’ve been learning and preparing our research design. Now it was time to put it into action! This was also my first time on University of Baltimore campus, so that was fun too. <p-lg>

Our Study

<p-lg>We performed a convergent mixed methods study based on a previous study that a previous group performed. In their quantitative study, they studied whether graphical passwords were more memorable for children than alpha-numeric passwords. They gave had each child create 5 passwords, some graphical and some alpha-numeric, all in different orders to prevent order bias. The touch targets for their graphical passwords were 40px. <p-lg>

<p-lg>After creating the passwords, the children were distracted for 20 minutes in a different room, given craft supplies (paper, crayons, etc.) and asked to “help create the password system of the future”.<p-lg>

<p-lg>From their study they concluded that alpha-numeric passwords were still more successful, but noted that had the touch targets been 20px larger, they would have been more successful. <p-lg>

<p-lg>We decided to test their conclusion. We performed almost the same study, increasing the touch area to 60px, and changing a few of the questions that we thought could be better. <p-lg>

Observations

<p-lg>On our first day we had 2 participants, ages 7 and 9. I got to help out in the distraction room and it was A BLAST. I learned a bunch from these 2 boys about how they think about passwords and they gave us some great insights. While just 2 participants is hardly conclusive evidence, even for qualitative data, it did reinforce some things that I’ve been learning about designing for kids.<p-lg>

1 They’re Not Afraid to Do Things that are out of the ordinary

<p-lg>Kid’s quickly break through the awkward and into creation mode. We adults are far more scared of what others will think of our ideas, no matter if we’ve established a “no dumb ideas” zone. Whether they understand exactly what they’re supposed to do or not, children quickly start making things.<p-lg>

<p-lg>And they just start at a natural space for them, then things kind of normalize as a group. As adults, we too often try to start at what we think is natural for the group, then talk about our interests as we feel comfortable. This often backfires because the group hasn’t normalized and can’t until we break out and start moving the conversation as a group. This usually requires someone picking a topic and then the group moving it around. This makes kids natural brainstormers.<p-lg>

<p-lg>When we were in the distraction session with Jim, he launched us into a discussion about his favorite video game, Skylanders. He told us all about the train that you ride through the game, the rare trophies you find, and was obsessed with finding the last boss and all the treasure chests. <p-lg>

<p-lg>Jim didn’t start off into a discussion about “passwords of the future”, he just started into something that felt natural to him that “passwords of the future” kind of reminded him of, and went from there. The group then had something to twist, bend, and mold as we brainstormed.<p-lg>

2 They may not know that they’re helping

<p-lg>Both Steven and Jim both expressed a sentiment that they didn’t really know what they were doing to help, but were just drawing random things. But this ended up being perfect! As they told us about what their drawing was and created different elements of the drawing they helped us peer into their brain and see what was important to them. <p-lg>

<p-lg>We asked them to help us design the password system of the future. Steven started drawing random lines, which turned into a rocket ship that flew into a pie. Somehow he moved on to fortune cookies that hold hints, and there’s a special cookie called the “Party fortune cookie”. <p-lg>

<p-lg>You take 5 fortune cookies and hide them in a gross-looking pie (but it’s actually a very tasty pie, you just tell everyone that it’s not). <p-lg>

<p-lg>Steven didn’t think this was a very valuable exercise, he was just passing the time. But we could see some themes that seemed important to him: <p-lg>

  • <p-lg>Multiple items could make up a password (fortune cookies)<p-lg>
  • <p-lg>Make it look unappealing or uninteresting to someone else (the gross pie)<p-lg>
  • <p-lg>One special item for differentiation (Party cookie vs. other cookies) <p-lg>

3 We can’t design for them without them

<p-lg>Obvious, but Steven’s “Party Fortune Cookies inside gross-looking pies” idea and Jim’s obsession on completing everything in a game reminded me how important it is that “You Are Not the User”. <p-lg>

<p-lg>What we’re learning is that children’s ideas about what it means to be secure online are quite different than adults and they think about the world from a completely different lens. Letting them co-create with us is incredibly important to creating meaning experiences for them.<p-lg>

Conclusion

<p-lg>It was a super fun week, and I learned a lot. I was also honored to be featured on UBALT’s social media outlets.<p-lg>