March 3, 2020

Users are looking for answers, not links with potential answers

<p-lg>From Wodtke and Govella, there were a couple things that interested me:‍The first was this quote:<p-lg>

“Search must be magic. That means having all the answers, not just links to Web sites that might. Search is a question whose answer is not always a Web site (or an article). When the best result is not a link, you have a chance to create a truly magical experience for your users and deliver beyond their wildest dreams."

<p-lg>I thought this was interesting because it draws out the human experience of searching. Users aren’t looking for a link when they search, they’re looking for an answer. The faster that your search engine can get them to an answer, the better their experience and potential engagement with your product. Thus you don’t want to just serve up links, you want to serve up answers.<p-lg>

<p-lg>Related to this idea was the idea of creating shortcuts, or widgets. You see these a lot in Google searches if you search for weather in a certain area or do a calculation. The author states <p-lg>

"These shortcuts are hard to measure, because unlike links, no one clicks. The user behavior looks much like failure—a query is made, and no link is clicked.”

<p-lg>I think this is interesting because at first glance at your data, it looks like your search engine failed, when in fact it may have served up a better answer faster, just by using one of these shortcuts.‍<p-lg>

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Users are looking for answers, not links with potential answers

information architecture
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March 3, 2020

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

<p-lg>From Wodtke and Govella, there were a couple things that interested me:‍The first was this quote:<p-lg>

“Search must be magic. That means having all the answers, not just links to Web sites that might. Search is a question whose answer is not always a Web site (or an article). When the best result is not a link, you have a chance to create a truly magical experience for your users and deliver beyond their wildest dreams."

<p-lg>I thought this was interesting because it draws out the human experience of searching. Users aren’t looking for a link when they search, they’re looking for an answer. The faster that your search engine can get them to an answer, the better their experience and potential engagement with your product. Thus you don’t want to just serve up links, you want to serve up answers.<p-lg>

<p-lg>Related to this idea was the idea of creating shortcuts, or widgets. You see these a lot in Google searches if you search for weather in a certain area or do a calculation. The author states <p-lg>

"These shortcuts are hard to measure, because unlike links, no one clicks. The user behavior looks much like failure—a query is made, and no link is clicked.”

<p-lg>I think this is interesting because at first glance at your data, it looks like your search engine failed, when in fact it may have served up a better answer faster, just by using one of these shortcuts.‍<p-lg>

March 3, 2020

Users are looking for answers, not links with potential answers

information architecture

<p-lg>From Wodtke and Govella, there were a couple things that interested me:‍The first was this quote:<p-lg>

“Search must be magic. That means having all the answers, not just links to Web sites that might. Search is a question whose answer is not always a Web site (or an article). When the best result is not a link, you have a chance to create a truly magical experience for your users and deliver beyond their wildest dreams."

<p-lg>I thought this was interesting because it draws out the human experience of searching. Users aren’t looking for a link when they search, they’re looking for an answer. The faster that your search engine can get them to an answer, the better their experience and potential engagement with your product. Thus you don’t want to just serve up links, you want to serve up answers.<p-lg>

<p-lg>Related to this idea was the idea of creating shortcuts, or widgets. You see these a lot in Google searches if you search for weather in a certain area or do a calculation. The author states <p-lg>

"These shortcuts are hard to measure, because unlike links, no one clicks. The user behavior looks much like failure—a query is made, and no link is clicked.”

<p-lg>I think this is interesting because at first glance at your data, it looks like your search engine failed, when in fact it may have served up a better answer faster, just by using one of these shortcuts.‍<p-lg>